We Mourn for a Lost Hero

by The Fountain

The great Nelson Mandela passed yesterday, moving on to the next life. Mandela, of course, was not only the first President of post-apartheid South Africa, but also an exceptional human rights hero whose work for economic and social justice, in the name of love, won him the Nobel Peace Prize.

For the rest of this piece on Mandela: http://blog.fountainmagazine.com/index/detail/We-Mourn-for-a-Lost-Hero-blog

News of the Death of Mr. Mandela

by Samuel D. Henry

I dance and I weep.
Like many of my contemporaries, I first heard about Mr. Mandela and the struggle against apartheid on my own college campus in the mid-1960s. Flyers, posters, rallies and ‘teach-ins’ educated us about the struggle to resist racial oppression, to respond to world-wide events, to actually become agents of change for humanity. His example showed how we could all participate on behalf of humanity and how personal leadership can effectively respond with moral authority. Over the years, many of them darkened by persecution, torture and inhumanity, we learned that one person-joined with others-can truly matter on the face of the Earth.

For the rest of Henry’s obituary for Mandela please visit http://blog.fountainmagazine.com/index/detail/news-of-the-death-of-mr-mandela

The New Cool? On the Pervasiveness of Obscene Language

by Mirkena Ozer

"My mother wouldn’t let me watch Gone with the Wind even if my life depended on it," my neighbor reminisces. We are taking a walk around the lake in our neighborhood. I am pushing a stroller where my son is soundly asleep. She is walking her dog. Her lively gait conceals her sixty five years. I love listening to her talk about her life, past and present. She is my little window into the insides of America. I am the foreigner who has just landed and is trying to makes sense of too many things at the same time.

"Why?" I ask her. "Why wouldn’t she let you?"

For the rest of the essay on obscene language we tend to ignore more every passing day, visit this link: http://www.fountainmagazine.com/blog/detail/the-new-cool-on-the-pervasiveness-of-obscene-language

Strength Through Diplomacy

by Justin Pahl

In the wake of the – very tentative – Syrian weapons deal between Russia and the United States, a rash of essays and editorials have run wondering what this means for US influence, both in the Middle East and the rest of the world. Some articles have claimed that this deal, which re-asserts Russia as an influence in the region, marks the end of American might.

For the rest of the essay: http://blog.fountainmagazine.com/index/detail/strength-through-diplomacy

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What Is Next for Smartphones?

by Halil I. Demir

Although it has been two decades since the first introduction of smartphones, there are already 1.5 billion smartphone users in the world out of 5 billion mobile phone users. Smartphones are changing every year, and becoming smarter and better with new sensors, powerful chips, and new capabilities. Newspapers and websites often start discussing rumors about an upcoming smartphone several months before its launch. 

Over the past few years we have seen many futuristic prototypes and designs for smartphones. Smartphone users demand for better and smarter phones with new capabilities every year. Although the phone companies are surprising us with new smartphones every year, we are far from seeing some of the technologies presented in prototypes. What do you expect to see in smartphones in the next 5 to 10 years? Let’s talk about some of the technologies that will end up in a smartphone in the near future.

For the rest of the article:

http://blog.fountainmagazine.com/index/detail/what-is-next-for-smartphones

A Modern Day Dilemma: Should Every Educated Woman Join the Work Force?

by Mirkena Ozer

As much as we praise education for girls as a valuable opportunity in and of itself, higher education for both genders is somehow expected to bring money. When a college graduate decides to stay home to raise her family, not everyone cheers her for her decision. There are some who think that her education turned out to be a waste of money and energy because as a stay-at-home mother she has little use for it. Others comment on how fruitful her contribution to the wider society would have been had she exercised her profession. No account on pleasures of  motherhood, nor any amount of reasoning on the part of the housewife can truly make her choice valid and laudable. 

For the rest of this post: http://blog.fountainmagazine.com/index/detail/a-modern-day-dilemma